The Dutch language in Japan (1600-1900) : a cultural and sociolinguistic study of Dutch as a contact language in Tokugawa and Meiji Japan / volume 24

Author: Joby, Christopher
Document Types:Book
Media Types:Monographie
Publication Date:2021
Series:Brill's studies in language, cognition and culture, volume 24
Publisher: Brill (Leiden ; Boston)
Subjects:Japan ; Niederländisch ; Geschichte 1600-1900
Language:English
ISBN:9789004436442
Extent:XIX, 494 SeitenIllustrationen
Permalink:https://search.fid-benelux.de/Record/ulb-6198663
Collection:ULB Katalog; Original Catalogue
Powered By:ULB Münster
Link(s):http://digitale-objekte.hbz-nrw.de/storage2/2021/04/26/file_4/9022670.pdf
Table of Contents:
  • Contents Acknowledgements X I I I List of Illustrations xv Abbreviations and Glossary of Japanese Terms xvn Prologue l 1 Introduction 1 2 Literature Review 2 3 Dutch as a Contact Language in Japan 4 4 Issues Concerning the Japanese Language 6 5 Terminology and Periodization 7 6 Chapter Summaries 8 Chapter 7 Those Who Already Knew Dutch in Japan 9 Chapter 2 Learning Dutch in Tokugawa Japan 10 Chapters The Many Uses ofDutch in Japan 10 Chapter4 Language Contact 11 Chapters Interference in Dutch Texts 12 Chapter 6 Translationfrom Dutch 13 Chapter 7 Lexical, Syntactic and Graphic Interference by Dutch in Japanese 14 Chapter 8 Language Shift and Recession 14 Epilogue 15 1 Those Who Already Knew Dutch in Japan 16 1 Introduction 16 2 The Dutch in Japan 17 2.1 The First Dutchman in Japan 17 2.2 The Crew of the Liefde 18 2.3 The Dutch at Hirado 20 2.4 The Dutch at Deshima 25 2.5 Prominent opperhoofden 29 3 Non-Dutch Europeans 33 4 Non-Europeans (Excludingjapanese) 40 5 Conclusion 42 2 Learning Dutch in Tokugawa Japan 44 1 Introduction 44 2 Status Quaestionis 45 3 Learning Dutch up to 1670 46 4 Learning Dutch after 1670 49 5 The Formalization of Studying Dutch and rangaku 58 5.1 Schools of Thought ryü (M) 58 5.2 Loc\\for Intellectual Exchange 59 5.3 Private Schools or shijuku (ÏLffi)/or the Study of Dutch and rangaku 61 6 Materials for Learning Dutch 67 6.1 Wordlists in the Seventeenth Century 68 6.2 Materials Produced by AraiHakuseki and AokiKonyö 69 6.3 Imported Learning Materials 71 6.4 Materials Developed by Ötsuki Gentaku, Maeno Ryôtaku and Morishima Chüryö 73 6.5 The Halma Lexicons 75 6.6 Other Lexicons Developed in the Nineteenth Century 78 6.7 Dutch Grammars in Japan 82 6.8 Guides to Dutch Pronunciation 85 7 Conclusion 86 3 The Many Uses of Dutch in Japan 89 1 Introduction 89 2 Spoken Dutch 90 3 Rangaku 95 4 Record-Keeping 96 5 Correspondence 100 6 Printing of Dutch Books 105 7 Dutch Names 106 8 Code Switching 109 9 Spielerei 111 10 Image and Text 112 10.1 Shiba Rökan 112 10.2 Image and Text in Works by Other Edo Artists 115 10.3 Image and Text in Works by Morishima Chüryö, Ötsuki Gentaku and Motoki Shöei 118 10.4 Image and Text in Works by Nagasaki Artists 121 10.5 Artworks Made on the hofreis 125 11 Dutch on Everyday Objects 126 12 Maps and Geographical Texts 130 13 Book Collecting and Reading 139 14 Conclusion 147 4 Language Contact 150 1 Introduction 150 2 Japanese 151 3 Portuguese 154 4 Latin 162 5 Malay 173 6 Sinitic Varieties 175 7 Korean 177 8 Ainu 178 9 German 181 10 Russian 184 n Manchu 188 12 French 189 13 English 195 14 Conclusion 201 5 Interference in Dutch Texts 204 1 Introduction 204 1.1 Sources 207 2 Contact Languages Other than Japanese 208 2.1 Latin 208 2.2 Portuguese 210 2.3 Sinitic Varieties 212 2.4 Malay and Persian 214 3 Phonological Issues 214 4 Code Switching by Motivation 218 4.1 Switching at the Beginning and End of Texts 4.2 Quoting Direct Speech 222 4.3 Switching to Provide Information 223 4.4 Giving a Proverb 224 4.5 No Motivation 226 5 Gap-Filling 227 5.1 Musical Instruments 227 5.2 Coins 229 5.3 Weights and Measures 229 5.4 Clothing and Portable Objects 232 5.5 Food and Drink 233 5.6 Japanese Writing Systems 234 5.7 Modes of Transport 234 5.8 Other Objects 236 5-9 Words Relating to Religion 236 5.10 Japanese Titles 237 5.11 The Names of Japanese Officials, Occupations and Institutions 239 5.12 Japanese Festivals 243 6 Toponyms 243 7 Morphological Integration 247 7.1 Plural Forms 247 7.2 Diminutive Forms 250 7.3 Genitive Forms and Adjectives 251 7.4 Demonyms 252 7.5 Concluding Remarks 252 8 Conclusion 252 6 Translation from Dutch 255 1 Introduction 255 2 Who Translates? 257 2.1 Cristóvao Ferreira/Sawano Chüan 257 2.2 Japanese Translators of Caspar Schambergers Medical Instructions 258 2.3 Inoue Masashige, Mukai Genshö andArashiyama Hoan 259 2.4 Höjö Ujinaga andJuriaen Schedel 262 2.5 Motoki Ryöi and Pinax Microcosmographicus 263 2.6 Eighteenth-Century Translators 264 2.7 Edo-Based Scholars 266 2.8 The Nineteenth Century 268 3 What Was Being Translated? 271 3.1 Jonstons Natural History and Dodoenss Cruydt-boeck 272 3.2 Physics and Chemistry 273 3.3 Cartographical, Geographical and Astronomical Works 274 3.4 Translations on History and Politics 276 3.5 More General Translations: Kômô zatsuwa and Kösei shinpen 276 3.6 Rangaku Translations: General Comments 279 3.7 The Translation of Administrative, Legal and Commercial Documents and Correspondence 280 3.8 Works of Fiction 283 4 ForWhom? 285 5 In What Manner? 286 5.1 Individual or Group Projects 287 5.2 The Nature of the Sources 287 5.3 Source and Target Languages 288 5.4 The Process of Translation 290 5.5 Translation of Cultures 295 5.6 Aids to Translation 297 5.7 The Form in Which Translations Circulated 298 6 With What Consequences? 299 6.1 Knowledge and Society 299 6.2 Politics 302 6.3 Language 304 7 Conclusion 305 7 Lexical, Syntactic and Graphic Interference by Dutch in Japanese 309 1 Introduction 309 2 Status Quaestionis 312 3 Methodological and Terminological Issues 316 3.1 Dating of First Use 316 3.2 Borrowing and Switching 317 3.3 Loanword Source 318 3.4 Inconsistency in Borrowing 320 3.5 Borrowings in Japanese Dialects 322 4 The Categorization of Contact-Induced Words 324 4.1 Methodology 324 4.2 Borrowability 326 4.3 Themes 326 4.4 Sources 327 5 Lexical Contact Phenomena in Japanese Resulting from Contact with Dutch 331 5.1 Lexical Borrowings (Modelled on the Donor Language) (488 Words) 332 5.2 Native Creations (89 Words) 366 5.3 Contact-Induced Words since the End of the Dutch Period in Japan 373 6 Lexical Contact Phenomena in Other Languages viajapanese 375 6.1 Sinitic Varieties 375 6.2 Korean 378 6.3 Ainu 380 7 The Influence of Dutch on Japanese Grammar 380 7.1 Tokoro-no 381 7.2 Ni-yotte 382 7-3 Other Influences of Dutch on Japanese Grammar 385 8 The Use of römaji in Japanese Texts 389 9 Conclusion 392 8 Language Shift and Recession 396 1 Introduction 396 2 1808-1853 398 2.1 Ranald MacDonald 398 2.2 Cornells Assendelft de Coningh 399 2.3 Bansho wage goyö 400 2.4 Imported Dutch Learning Material 401 2.5 The Nabeshima Collection 402 2.6 Volume of Translations 403 2.7 Concluding Remarks for the Period Prior to 1834 403 3 1854-1868 404 3.1 Learning Dutch 406 3.2 Dutch Books 407 3.3 Official Actions 410 3.4 Other Western Languages: English 410 3.5 Dutch as the Language of Diplomacy 414 4 1868 Onwards 417 4.1 Further Dutch Arrive in Japan 418 4.2 Belgians in Japan 419 4.3 Dutch Books in Japan: Signs ofDecline 420 5 Conclusion 422 Epilogue 425 1 The Roles Dutch Played as a Contact Language in Japan 425 2 Further Research Opportunities 428 3 Concluding Remarks 429 Bibliography 431 Index of Japanese Primary Sources by Title 465 Index of Non-Japanese and Non-Chinese Names 475 Index of Japanese and Chinese Names 480 Index of Subj ects and Places 486